Print 101


Print projects can become challenging to tackle. That’s why we’ve created Print 101. We’ll cover common questions and concerns, from learning the best CMYK Black Builds to setting up Full Service EDDM® Postcards files. Whether you need a quick refresher or are ready to learn something new, our Print 101 is the blog to beat.

How to Set Up Mask Files for Printing

How to Set Up Mask Files for Printing

Products including special features like Spot UV, Raised Spot UV, Stamped Foil, Inline Foil, or White Ink all require for the feature layer to be set up as a mask file. When placing an order for a product that requires a mask file, you must include a 100%K (Black) template file along with your regular print file. […]

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Products including special features like Spot UV, Raised Spot UV, Stamped Foil, Inline Foil, or White Ink all require for the feature layer to be set up as a mask file.

When placing an order for a product that requires a mask file, you must include a 100%K (Black) template file along with your regular print file.  This mask file is used as a template to show where the feature will be printed on the product. White areas of the mask file indicate that the feature should not be printed on that area. For the best results, we recommend submitting your mask file as a vector file.

The above example shows a 100%K mask file, print file, and an image of the printed cards. These cards feature the Honey Hive logo in black stamped foil. The logo is set up in a separate mask file from the print file. This indicates to the printer that part of the cards should be printed in black stamped foil instead of ink. The placement of the logo in the center of the mask file, lets the printer know the exact location in which the stamped foil should be printed.

If you have any questions when setting up your mask file please contact our amazing customer service team. They are always happy to assist! You can also watch out tutorial walking you through the process on how to set up your mask file.

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What is Bleed & Why do Print Files Require it?

File Bleed is required for offset printing. This blog explains why.

To bleed or not to bleed – that is the question. When it comes to print, the answer is to bleed. So what exactly is bleed, and why is it required to be included in your print files? Bleed is the extra area included in a print file that allows ink and finishes to be printed […]

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To bleed or not to bleed – that is the question. When it comes to print, the answer is to bleed. So what exactly is bleed, and why is it required to be included in your print files?

Bleed is the extra area included in a print file that allows ink and finishes to be printed all the way to the edge of the printed piece. Bleeds extend further than the cut line to ensure that a white edge does not remain after the cutting process. If the incorrect amount of bleed or no bleed is included in the print file then any shift when cutting would lead to a small amount of white area remaining on the product.

All of our file setup templates include a bleed area so that you can be sure your artwork contains the correct amount of bleed. The background of your design should extend past the trim line to the edge of the file. We require all files to be submitted with bleed. The area between the red and gray lines in our templates is the bleed area. This is the area that your artwork is required to extend to.

Business Card File Template

The majority of our standard print products like business cards require a bleed of 0.0625″ on all sides. Your bleed can be larger than this just keep in mind that you may get a warning when you upload your files.  As long as the previews look good, you should be all set.

Check File Bleed with Uploader Feature

Large format products such as banners and H-stake signs do not require any bleed. If you any questions regarding bleed or the setup of your print files please contact one of our awesome customer service representatives. They will be happy to review your files.

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7 Essential Tips for Designing Business Cards

Business Card Design Tips

As a designer, I’m constantly having customers tell me that they want a card that “pops.” Some people may think that means they want a card that is a bright neon color and that jumps out at you. But I have come to understand that people, in general, want a card that stands out from […]

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As a designer, I’m constantly having customers tell me that they want a card that “pops.” Some people may think that means they want a card that is a bright neon color and that jumps out at you. But I have come to understand that people, in general, want a card that stands out from the crowd. And how you achieve that, is not always the way one might think.

If you want your premium business card to really “pop”, there are a few do’s and don’ts to keep in mind.

First and Most Important, Keep it Simple

The more information you have on a card, the harder it is to 1. Find what you are looking for and 2. Figure out the best way to reach you.

SEE ALSO: Details on How to Create a Business Card

Limit Your Phone Numbers

Phone numbers, for example, are one way to simplify your card. How do you want your customer to call you? The main office? Your receptionist? Your cell phone? Why not direct all of your calls to one place? It’s a lot easier to determine where to call when you only give them one option. And how often do you use your fax machine? If very few of your customers actually fax you something, maybe consider leaving that off too. If they need it, they’ll ask for it.

Your Physical Address

Do you have a business where you want people dropping in? If not, maybe it’s best to leave that off as well. At Primo Print, all of our business is done online, with companies all over the world. Very seldom do we have people who come into our physical offices. So there is no need for us to include our mailing address on our business cards. 

Social Media

Social media has created a whole new world for communicating with customers. Letting people know which sites you are on can be important, but consider using the sites logo icon, rather than spelling out your entire handle. These sites have made it really simple for people to type in your name and find you.

Simplified Business Card Design Comparison

High-Resolution Logo

Sell yourself right with a high-resolution version of your logo. I’ve seen companies that appear to cut and paste their logo from a scan and then try to use it on their cards. Unfortunately, that will not print well and doesn’t make your company look very professional. If you don’t have a high-res file, consider hiring a graphic designer to recreate it for you. Most of the time this is a simple process and will be a lot cheaper than designing a new one from scratch.

Smile!

If you want to use a photo on your card, I recommend hiring a professional photographer to take it. Selfies are great for Facebook, not so much for your business card. Put yourself in the best light with a nice photo, that was taken at a high resolution, by someone who knows how to make you look good!

Use Professional Photos on Business Cards

Check Your Fonts

There are a million “cool” fonts out there. In every style you can possibly image. When designing a business card, try to keep your fonts very basic. These are easier to read. It should compliment your logo, but not have a strong stylistic feel to them. And make sure your font is set large enough for people to read. Small type always looks better, but depending on your clientele you may need to keep it a little larger.

As with any design, the look of your business card is very personal and subjective. What I like, you may not. And what works for my business may not work for yours. So find other cards that you like and figure out what it is about those cards that make it successful. And if you need help, don’t be afraid to ask. The designers here at Primo Print would love to help you out!

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Take Your Design to New Heights with Raised Spot UV

New! Raised Spot UV Gloss

Looking for a showstopper for your next networking event? Turn heads with our raised Spot UV business cards and postcards. Chic and classy, raised Spot UV is sure to heighten your style. The raised glossy texture truly elevates your design, a perfect contrast to the 19PT velvet laminated stock it is currently available. Raised Spot UV can […]

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Looking for a showstopper for your next networking event? Turn heads with our raised Spot UV business cards and postcards. Chic and classy, raised Spot UV is sure to heighten your style. The raised glossy texture truly elevates your design, a perfect contrast to the 19PT velvet laminated stock it is currently available. Raised Spot UV can be used to create highlights, dimension, and contrast.

Spot UV Comparison

Our regular Spot UV is a flat finish, a shiny gloss layer that is applied where you’re seeking an area of high gloss coating. Raised Spot UV uses a similar process, except the applied UV is raised off the card. You can actually feel raised Spot UV when you run your fingers over it. Both are available on our 19PT velvet laminated stock. Regular Spot UV is printed offset, and raised Spot UV is printed digitally.Raised vs Standard Spot UV Gloss

Raised Spot UV is available to be printed on the front or both sides on our  2” x 3.5” 19PT velvet laminated business cards in quantities of 100 and 250. However, we hope to be able to offer it on both sides in the near future for our 4” x 6” 19PT velvet laminated postcards.

Raised Spot UV Mask File Setup

The file mask for raised Spot UV business cards and postcards must be submitted as a 100%K (100% Black) vector file. 

How to Set Up Raised Spot UV Mask File

If you have any questions regarding raised Spot UV please let one of our awesome Customer Service Representatives know, and they’ll be happy to assist you.

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