Design


Graphic design continues to evolve year-to-year. To stay up-to-date, our in-house graphic designers will share the latest design trends, tips, resources and news to keep you in the know.

Typographic Hierarchy

3 Levels of Typographic Hierarchy

In communication, it is important is to establish effective typographic hierarchy. According to educational website lynda.com, “typographic hierarchy is the way type is organized in order to indicate levels of importance to the view.” Through this particular organizational system, one is able to combine both typographic and spatial elements to create the desired effect. In […]

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In communication, it is important is to establish effective typographic hierarchy. According to educational website lynda.com, “typographic hierarchy is the way type is organized in order to indicate levels of importance to the view.”

Through this particular organizational system, one is able to combine both typographic and spatial elements to create the desired effect. In mixing different sizes, weights, and fonts in typeface or incorporating drastic colors or white space, one can impact a copy’s readability and usefulness.

There are three levels of typography that are used to create an effective hierarchy.

  • Level One: This is viewed as the most important content or information: this should be the most prominent typographic element in your design. 
  • Level Two: Generally, these elements help organize your design into sections or help group similar information together. While it shouldn’t stand out as much as your Level 1 type, it should clearly guide viewers through the different parts of the design.
  • Level Three: When you have a text-heavy layout, this level of typography is typically the meat of the design. This is the copywriting text, where you get into your design’s message. Level 3 can vary in length—from a couple of paragraphs to a brief description; the primary concern is to ensure the content is easy to read as the font will be smaller.

Learn the importance of Typography Hierarchy in print

In establishing typographic hierarchy, weight and typefaces are essential, particularly for headlines or subheads. In addition to decorative and bold typefaces, a very light typeface can also draw attention in the right setting.

Type Size

The viewer’s eye is first captivated by the largest-size type and then continues to other elements. With three levels of typography, the font size generally starts out biggest at the top (Level One), and it decreases in size as you move down the page. Since we read from left to right and top to bottom, the top-to-bottom hierarchy is the most natural way for readers to navigate information.

Color

Using color either attracts attention or de-emphasizes an element. Because colors carry their own meanings and associations, make sure that your color selection matches your brand and design purpose. Remember, an overuse of color can create visual confusion, which will undermine its effectiveness.

Case

Using capitalization sparingly can be an effective way to capture one’s attention and show importance, especially in headings or subheadings. However, all caps can be detrimental to readability, so using traditional uppercase and lowercase is preferable for lengthier text.

Placement and Setting

The placement of every element as well as the kerning, or space between and around them, is part of the overall hierarchy. Make sure to keep the most important information prominent. Place all related elements together and visually separate others to organize and structure the content.

Alignment

The way in which you align elements implies their relative level of significance. For example, centering conveys a sense of importance; it is most commonly used for titles, invitations, headlines, and announcements. On the other hand, running body copy generally calls for less focus than headings and subheadings; this is why is it generally set flush left, making it easier to read and comprehend.

White Space

Using negative or white space can create emphasis and draw attention to key content and elements. It is best not to overload every inch of space on a page because that can create excessive “visual noise,” fatiguing or confusing the reader.

An effective design offers visual clues to guide the observer through the content. Successful typographic hierarchy is crucial to communicating the intended message and maximizing the chances of the content being read and comprehended.

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3 Influential Rebrands

Top 3 Influential Rebrands

We demand a lot from logos. Logos have to be simple while conveying the brand’s ethos so that it resonates with its consumers. In addition to being timeless and distinct, they must still be modern and follow contemporary graphic designs. Below are three of the most influential rebrands from 2016. SIMPLIFICATION: MASTERCARD One big trend […]

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We demand a lot from logos. Logos have to be simple while conveying the brand’s ethos so that it resonates with its consumers. In addition to being timeless and distinct, they must still be modern and follow contemporary graphic designs.

Below are three of the most influential rebrands from 2016.

SIMPLIFICATION: MASTERCARDMastercard simplified their logo, which has become a recent logo trend.

One big trend this year is logo simplification. Pressure from social media, current design preferences, and digital advertising currently dictate that logos need to be legible when small. This means that companies are investing billions to rebrand to simpler, flatter logos. While the logo’s interlocking circles remain, the horizontal lines framing the word “Mastercard” and sitting in the overlap have been removed and replaced by an orange shade, the end result of mixing primary colors yellow and red. The combination strives to cement “connectivity” and “seamlessness,” one of the company’s key brand messages.

Following the rebrand, research conducted by Mastercard showed that more than 80% of consumers still recognized the symbol without the inclusion of the name.

NEGATIVE SPACE: INSTAGRAM
Instagram's Rebranded Icon to include negative space.

Negative Space can provide a memorable way of calling to attention a company’s attributes. While Instagram kept its camera icon, they switched from a retro three-dimensional design to a flat, minimalist design. The use of negative space is key in their new design, as it outlines the camera lens and flashes against the rainbow gradient.

CLEAN LINES: TACO BELLTaco Bell's New Brand Identity with the use of clean lines.

As companies are leaning more towards simplification, one of the first things to go has been and textures. Rather, larger businesses are opting for logos with clean, simple lines, as this makes building signage easier and more cost effective.

Taco Bell’s designers opted to pair down the logo, replacing its magenta, purple and yellow with a regal purple with subtle gradient shading. It utilizes white space to shape the bell.

Think your brand could use a refresh? Our design team would be happy to assist you with creating a new modern identity for your business. For more information about our logo design services click here or email design@primoprint.com.

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New! Adobe Illustrator CC Print Design Templates

New! Adobe Illustrator Print Templates

Adobe Illustrator CC has been a powerful design tool for quite some time, and the folks at Adobe continue to impress me with each new update that is released. One of my favorite new features from Adobe Creative Cloud is the ability to design faster with print templates for business cards, brochures and flyers, postcards, invites, […]

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Adobe Illustrator CC has been a powerful design tool for quite some time, and the folks at Adobe continue to impress me with each new update that is released. One of my favorite new features from Adobe Creative Cloud is the ability to design faster with print templates for business cards, brochures and flyers, postcards, invites, posters, letterhead and more. In this blog, I’m going to feature some of my favorite designs currently included for free use with your Adobe CC membership. You can access these design files by opening the most current version of Adobe Illustrator CC and clicking on “Print” in the new document window.

Business Cards

This 2″ x 3.5″ “Simple Business Card” template designed by Owen Jones offers a clean design with 4 accent pattern swatches available. Various business card templates are available, but this one stood out as one of my favorites.

This 2″ x 3.5″ “Simple Business Card” template designed by Owen Jones offers a clean design with 4 accent pattern swatches available.

Flyers

This 8″ x 11.5″ “Record Player Flyer” template designed by Guuver has fully editable vector graphics as well as editable text. A variety of flyer design templates are available, but this one really impressed me.

This 8″ x 11.5″ “Record Player Flyer” template designed by Guuver has fully editable vector graphics as well as editable text.

Postcards

The “Bold Postcards Set” by Hands-On offers 4″ x 6″ postcard layouts with bleed. There are 4 available front designs and 4 available back designs to choose from. The “Bold Postcards Set” by Hands-On offers 4″ x 6″ postcard layouts with bleed.

One of the awesome features of these templates is that they come with easy-to-understand instructions and the files are already set up to meet print requirements. The fonts used in the designs can all be synced from Typekit. The files are set up in CMYK color mode, and the artwork is at 300dpi and that includes bleed. The bleed for each file varies, but you can adjust the bleed to 0.0625″ on all four sides by clicking on file > document setup > bleed. So, you just need to fill in the information you would like to have printed in the provided fields and save for printing.

Check out the above designs and all the other available free templates by opening the latest version of Adobe Illustrator CC and clicking on “Print” in the new document window.

 

 

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Designer Spotlight: Mitzi Wickersham

Graphic Designer Spotlight: Mitzi Wickersham

Since the age of 15, Mitzi Wickersham knew she wanted to pursue her passion for graphic design. “I really love old posters, like from the 60s and 70s—anything that’s a print based type of graphic, going back to the printing press,” she said. The Indiana University Bloomington graduate defines her design style as “clean, simple, […]

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Since the age of 15, Mitzi Wickersham knew she wanted to pursue her passion for graphic design.

“I really love old posters, like from the 60s and 70s—anything that’s a print based type of graphic, going back to the printing press,” she said.

The Indiana University Bloomington graduate defines her design style as “clean, simple, uncluttered, and functional.”

Mitzi Wickersham Designed these beautiful, simple and functional custom business card.

She pays tribute to well-known graphic designers such as Herb Lubalin and Lotta Jansdotter in her work.

“Lubalin’s type setting and iconic logos and posters were very bold, simple, and type-heavy,” Wickersham said. “ I love how he was always able to make a major statement with very “little” design. More of a modern designer that I follow is Jansdotter. She is a print and pattern maker, and I adore her simple, hand-drawn patterns that are Scandinavian inspired.”

Mitzi Wickersham often uses pattern design in her business card designs.

Most of Wickersham’s work revolves around small business branding, ranging from single freelance photographers to a start up granola bar company.

“I enjoy [working with] companies that need help with their whole brand and not necessarily hoping to just get a logo and a business card, even though I do get a lot of those too,” she said. “But the small business branding and marketing is definitely my favorite part.”

For the past six years, Wickersham has primarily used our services to create premium, custom business cards and occasionally flyers

Mitzi Wickersham creates spectacular sell sheets for small business branding.

Her work revolves around small business branding, ranging from single freelance photographers to a start up granola bar company.

“I started working with you guys when you only had one printing facility, so I’ve worked with you guys for quite a while,” she said. “You guys had great pricing on Spot UV. And then I kept coming back to you because your customer service is the best.”

Mitzi Wickersham simple business card design.

Those interested in learning more about Wickersham and her design services should visit www.mitziwick.com

Interested in being featured for our Graphic Designer Spotlight? Reach out to Elizabeth@primoprint.com for more information.

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