Jen Johnson

Jen is the Brand Manager at Primo Print. She's responsible for our brand development and strategy as well executing marketing campaigns. She's an avid fan of the Carolina Panthers, craft beer, yoga, and good design.

What is Bleed & Why do Print Files Require it?

File Bleed is required for offset printing. This blog explains why.

To bleed or not to bleed – that is the question. When it comes to print, the answer is to bleed. So what exactly is bleed, and why is it required to be included in your print files? Bleed is the extra area included in a print file that allows ink and finishes to be printed […]

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To bleed or not to bleed – that is the question. When it comes to print, the answer is to bleed. So what exactly is bleed, and why is it required to be included in your print files?

Bleed is the extra area included in a print file that allows ink and finishes to be printed all the way to the edge of the printed piece. Bleeds extend further than the cut line to ensure that a white edge does not remain after the cutting process. If the incorrect amount of bleed or no bleed is included in the print file then any shift when cutting would lead to a small amount of white area remaining on the product.

All of our file setup templates include a bleed area so that you can be sure your artwork contains the correct amount of bleed. The background of your design should extend past the trim line to the edge of the file. We require all files to be submitted with bleed. The area between the red and gray lines in our templates is the bleed area. This is the area that your artwork is required to extend to.

Business Card File Template

The majority of our standard print products like business cards require a bleed of 0.0625″ on all sides. Your bleed can be larger than this just keep in mind that you may get a warning when you upload your files.  As long as the previews look good, you should be all set.

Check File Bleed with Uploader Feature

Large format products such as banners and H-stake signs do not require any bleed. If you any questions regarding bleed or the setup of your print files please contact one of our awesome customer service representatives. They will be happy to review your files.

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What is Print Resolution & Why Does it Matter?

Print Resolution Example Image

What is 300dpi, and why does it matter? Have you ever zoomed into your monitor so close that images no longer look crisp, but rather a close-up of a Monet painting? When you really zoomed in, the images lose their visibility and turn into little dots of color. Those dots are called pixels. The more […]

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What is 300dpi, and why does it matter?

Have you ever zoomed into your monitor so close that images no longer look crisp, but rather a close-up of a Monet painting? When you really zoomed in, the images lose their visibility and turn into little dots of color. Those dots are called pixels. The more dots (or pixels) you have, the better the image will look when printed. This is also what we refer to when we say “dpi” or “dots per inch”.

300dpi

A high-resolution file will have a higher number of dots, which is required for printing. 300dpi (dots per inch) is the resolution we recommend for print files. Files submitted to print that have a resolution lower than 300dpi will likely result in a lesser quality or blurred print product.  We often receive files that are 72dpi which is the required resolution for digital outputs such as computer screens. These low-resolution files will appear clear on screen but will print quite blurry. See the example below of two business card files. The left image printed at 300dpi and the right image printed at 72dpi.

Print resolution comparison - 300dpi vs. 72dpi

If you receive a resolution warning when uploading your files please send your files to info@primoprint.com. One of our file processors will be able to check the files and let you know if higher resolution images need to be provided.

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Creative Sites that Inspire Our Team

Get Inspired by these Design Sites

To inspire means to give someone the craving or capability to do or feel something, something creative. Below are four sites that inspire our creative team. Check them out and get inspired! Tweet @Primoprint your favorite sites to draw inspiration from using the hashtag #GetInspired. Juxtapoz Juxtapoz.com offers a huge variety of articles highlighting artists across […]

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To inspire means to give someone the craving or capability to do or feel something, something creative. Below are four sites that inspire our creative team. Check them out and get inspired! Tweet @Primoprint your favorite sites to draw inspiration from using the hashtag #GetInspired.

Juxtapoz

Juxtapoz.com offers a huge variety of articles highlighting artists across the media spectrum. It’s a great place to be inspired visually as well as come away having learned something new.

– Kelly Alexander (Graphic Designer)

Creative Market  

Every Monday morning I get excited to check out the freebies from creativemarket.com which more often than not inspire a new design.

– Michaela Horton (Graphic Designer + Photographer)

Dribbble

Dribbble is show and tell for designers.” It’s a great way to see what other designers are working on and allows members to give and receive feedback on their latest projects.

– Jen Johnson (Brand Manager)

Bashooka

I really like the blog Bashooka. There are a ton of posts about inspiration, freebies, templates, how-to’s, etc. They really seem to be in touch with current trends and they post often!

– Brooke Ernst (Design Team Director)

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CMYK Rich Black Build

Rich Black CMYK Values

Printing a true or rich black can be tricky, so we’re breaking down CMYK configurations for our suggested rich black CMYK build and explaining why some of the frequently used black builds are not recommended. The printing industry suggests many variations of CMYK configurations for printing a true or rich black. After a lot of testing […]

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Printing a true or rich black can be tricky, so we’re breaking down CMYK configurations for our suggested rich black CMYK build and explaining why some of the frequently used black builds are not recommended.

The printing industry suggests many variations of CMYK configurations for printing a true or rich black. After a lot of testing and calibration, we’ve selected a configuration that works best for our printing presses.

Using rich black results in a darker tone than 100% black ink alone. For the best possible results, we recommend a rich black value of C60, M40, Y40, K100 for all printed products.

C0, M0, Y0, K100 will usually result in a very dark gray, but not a rich black. We commonly see the default black in Adobe Photoshop used instead of our recommended rich black build. The issue with using C75, M68, Y67, K90 is that it will not print a truly rich black. That configuration is the result of converting true black in RGB to CMYK. The print result will generally be muddy due to the oversaturated color build.

For the best results, we recommend using the values listed in the above chart. Have any questions? Feel free to contact our awesome customer support team for further assistance.

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